How to Set Up Your Anti-Phishing Welcome Message

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Phishing is a type of internet fraud. Passpack offers protection against phishing by letting you choose a personal Welcome Message. The Welcome Message lets you be sure that you are connecting to the real Passpack, and not a copycat fraud website. If you see your Welcome Message, you are safe. If not, don't panic, just read these instructions.

You will encounter some technical terms during this process, however once you have completed the set up the hardest part is over. From within your Passpack account, go to Settings > Welcome Message.

 

(1) Type in the sentence you'd like Passpack to greet you with every time you sign in (this is the fun part). You should see the preview change as you type.

(2) Since you must set up a Welcome Message in order to use the Remember me feature, we've placed an option here to turn it on or off as well. If you logged into Passpack and forgot to check the Remember Me on the login screen, you can do that now.

(3) If you want to make signing into Passpack faster, you can choose to deactivate the intro screen. We don't suggest doing this since you will not benefit from the hand eye training.

(4) When you press the Update button, the IP address that you are currently connecting from will be automatically added to those which are allowed to see the Welcome Message. You need only choose if you want to activate Just This IP, the IP Family. or the Extended IP Family. The difference is explained below (scroll down to the next heading).

(5) You may also see a list of IP addresses that have already been added. You can choose to deactivate any of these if you wish. if you're not sure, leave this as.is.

(6) Press the Update button when you're done.

What do "IP" and "IP family" mean?

An IP address is the number your internet provider assigns to your internet connection. An example of an IP address could be 23.180.210.56.

An IP family is a set of IP addresses, where just a  few of the last numbers change. For example both 23.180.210.37 and 23.180.210.86 are part of the same IP family because only the last two numbers are different.

An IP extended family is a set of IP addresses, where the last half of number change. For example both 23.180.210.37 and 23.180.244.86 are part of the same IP extended family.

Four ways an IP can change

Let's assume you have 23.180.210.37 activated as your IP address. Here are some examples:

  1. When you reconnect, your new IP is 23.180.210.38.
    The provider is assigning adjacent numbers.Simply pressing the Update button will add the new IP address automatically. There is no need to change any other settings.
  2. When you reconnect, your new IP is 23.180.210.97.
    The provider is seems to be using the entire IP family. Activating the IP family option would be useful.
  3. When you reconnect, your new IP is 23.180.64.137.
    The provider is seems to be using the entire IP extended family. Activating the IP extended family option would be useful.
  4. When you reconnect, your new IP is 29.163.164.47.
    The provider is assigning radically different IP addresses. In this case, unfortunately, you will not be able to use the Welcome Message. You might as well deactivate it (sorry).

Issues When You Travel Around

Every time you physically move to another place, then your IP address will change. This means that you will not see the Welcome Message. However, many people often connect from two or three different places on a regular basis. You can set up Passpack to recognize the IP of these places as well.

To set this up, you need to physically go to each place, connect to Passpack (you will not see your Welcome Message so do not fear), then enter your account as usual. Go to Security > Welcome Message, scroll to the bottom of the page and press the Update button. There is no need to change any other settings. From this point on, you should be able to see your Welcome Message from this location as well.

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